Online dating culture

Posted by / 30-Sep-2019 16:43

If you disagreed with your parents’ choice, or if your parents were unable to find you a partner, you would have to either accept your fate, or find different ways to look for someone.The rise of newspapers created a solution for this problem, with their personal advertisements section, the analogue version of dating websites.Dating apps enable us to do things we have never done before and are now often created to fit into a specific (sub)culture.This article discusses several dating apps using theories regarding globalization.The famous opening line of Jane Austen's (1813) classic book 'Pride and Prejudice' runs as follows: The expressed sentiment illustrates that the characters in the book, like most people, are much occupied with finding a partner, to attain things like love, stability or security.A partner in the time of Jane Austen was usually handpicked or at least approved of by the parents.She was even sent to an asylum by the government for four weeks, for it was believed she was mentally unstable.

The first woman to ever place a personal ad was Helen Morrison.

The next several dates also go poorly until she meets Jake.

Interestingly, Jake was pushed into meeting Sarah (someone else arranged the date).

Tinder and Badoo are easily accessible apps and can be used by anyone, no matter your gender, age or sexual preferences, but there is more to find in the world of dating apps than just Tinder and Badoo.

There are dating apps that focus on smaller communities, trying to connect people on certain common values or interests, for instance marginalised groups like homosexuals, ethnic minorities, but also elite groups, millionaires or extremely successful businessmen and -women.

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Their first meeting is awkward for several reasons (including that they both feel awkward for having met online).